Wednesday, 27 April 2011

Today's post brought me something interesting ...

After a day of ups and downs ... and nearly four hours of sitting in the main hall waiting to interview prospective students who did not turn up ... I finally got home at about 7.30pm. Waiting for me was a large cardboard package, and after getting myself a soft drink, I sat down and opened it. Inside was Osprey's latest offering, ARMIES OF THE BALKAN WARS 1912-13: THE PRIMING CHARGE FOR THE GREAT WAR.

I had ordered this book from Amazon some time ago, and was eagerly looking forward to receiving it. It is part of the Men-at-Arms series (No. 466 [ISBN 978 1 84908 418 5]) and it was written by Philip S Jowett and illustrated by Stephen Walsh.

The Balkan Wars have been one of my areas of interest for many years, and even a cursory look through this book has given me lots of ideas for possible armies that I could 'raise' to use with my portable wargame and for FUNNY LITTLE WARS.

12 comments:

  1. Hi Bob,

    It is a very nice tome and is one of my favourite Osprey titles - no prizes for guessing why! As I posted recently it has presented me with a small problem though....

    All the best,

    DC

    ReplyDelete
  2. Ray Rousell,

    I totally agree! The Balkan Wars are very much 'wargamer's wars'; lots of different armies and uniforms, as well national and internation ramifications.

    All the best,

    Bob

    ReplyDelete
  3. David Crook,

    It is a small but very interesting book that does inspire one to have even more wargaming projects whirling around in one's head.

    If only we had the time ...

    All the best,

    Bob

    ReplyDelete
  4. Excellant book ! , I only wish the Balkans War had took place about 15 years earlier when all the participants would have been in more colourful uniforms . My 40 mm armies on my blog (tin soldiering on) are loosly based on the Balkans with the odd invented one thrown in . The Balkans War 1912-1913 by Alexander Vachkov (avaible via Amazon) is very good as well, a bit more in deapth, although the translation is a little odd in places .

    ReplyDelete
  5. Mosstrooper,

    A Balkan War in the late 1880s/ early 1890s is a distinctly attractive prospect on many levels. (Oh no! Not another possible project!)

    Thanks for the book reference. I may well buy a copy as soon as I have sufficient funds.

    All the best,

    Bob

    ReplyDelete
  6. If you wanted some kind of operational-strategic game to give a framework to your individual battles, a not-so-long-ago issue of Strategy and Tactics features the Balkan Wars. It's a Joe Miranda design and as far as I know, the only board wargaem on the subject. Nice articles, too.
    http://www.boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/10269/balkan-wars

    ReplyDelete
  7. Ltmurnau,

    Many thanks for this information. I was not aware that this had been published, but I will now try to find a copy.

    All the best,

    Bob

    ReplyDelete
  8. Bob,

    The chap on the left looks very dashing in his red jacket. Another book that I'm unsurprised to see in your library, but surprised that you didn't try your hand at yourself.

    Roll on retirement, when hopefully some kindly soul will chain you to a desk, hand you pen and ink and tell you to stop lollygagging!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Conrad Kinch,

    One day ... one day ...

    All the best,

    Bob

    ReplyDelete
  10. Bob,

    I found an unexpected source of Balkan Wars info: Youtube!!! Do a search for "Bulgarian Army" and all kinds of stuff pops up. Who would have expected it? It is also interesting to read viewers' comments--the Serbs and Bulgarians have not forgotten the slightest insult...

    Best regards,

    Chris

    ReplyDelete
  11. Chris,

    It is amazing what you can find on Youtube!

    I have found a whole series of films about the Chaco War as well as the entire film 'Turkish Gambit' split into a lot of small 'chunks'.

    I am not surprised that there is still animosity between the various parties to the Balkan Wars; nations and peoples have long memories ... which is why studying history tells us so much about the present-day World.

    All the best,

    Bob

    ReplyDelete