Thursday, 26 January 2017

Who is buying which version of my book?

In response to a comment made yesterday, I looked at which versions of my PORTABLE WARGAME book were selling, and what regions of the world were buying it. The results looked like this:

Sales by version (i.e. eBook, paperback, and hardback)


I had expected that the sale of the eBook would do well, followed closely by the paperback, with the hardback coming quite some way behind ... but the figures prove those assumptions to be wrong.

Sales by region


I had expected the percentage sales in the UK to be much greater than they are (closer to 90%), with a few sales in the US and Australia ... and not many sales outside that area. Again my assumptions have not proven to be as accurate as I had expected, and sales seem to be much more geographically spread than I could have imagined.

10 comments:

  1. I was surprised that the e-book is doing so well, even though I'm one of its purchasers. My expectation would be for a stronger preference for paper for non fiction like this.

    Do the versions differ by region? Probably only worth measuring for UK and US.

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    1. Mike Hall,

      I have the impression that several people bought the eBook version of the book and then opted to buy a printed version.

      I'm not sure if there is a significant difference between the two main regions as to which version of the book they buy ... but I will have a look at the figures if only to satisfy my own curiosity.

      All the best,

      Bob

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  2. I'm not surprised that the ebook is not quite 1/2 and suspect that it would be even lower if delivery wasn't practically instantaneous.

    Ebooks are fine for reading texts from start to finish but are less convenient if there are diagrams, charts and illustrations and if one may want to flip back and forth. On a small handheld device the charts will often be too small to read (esp for eyes of a certain age) or else broken up making them awkward to use. A bigger screen is less convenient to have at hand during a game.

    In addition to that, the feel of a paper book is different, much like the feel of miniatures vs computer graphics thus appealing to the miniatures player.

    Lastly, I'm not surprised at hardcover sales. To me it would indicate not only that the buyers want it to last but that they consider it important and already have an attachment to the subject and author.

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    1. Ross Mac,

      I expected the eBook to sell because it was inexpensive and allowed purchasers to read the book's text before deciding whether or not to buy the printed version.

      I would always opt for printed rather than electronic rules, and hardback rather than paperback if the latter isn't too expensive. I suspect that others feel the same.

      All the best,

      Bob

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  3. Bob

    Having purchased the ebook (cheap and instant) and read the text, I shall proceed in an orderly fashion to pick up a paper copy as I'm far too attached to material things and too old to change now.
    Agree with all of the comments made by Ross also.

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    1. Maudlin Jack Tar,

      I still buy printed books for almost everything other than fiction. I've tried reading military history eBooks, but the maps and illustrations are always too small.

      All the best,

      Bob

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  4. Hardback has the virtue of heft and of durability (the more well thumbed of my paperback tend to fall to pieces eventually - a real drag). I changed my mind from paperback to hard when I decided my finances could endure the hit... :-D

    Curious as to whether there has been much action from NZ (Christchurch in particular). My war games tastes are out of the local main stream, so it's hard to find like-minded chaps...

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    1. Archduke Piccolo,

      I hope that you are pleased with you decision. Personally I would always choose hardback over softback if I can afford it.

      I don't think that anyone from New Zealand has enquired about the book .. but I live in hopes!

      All the best,

      Bob

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  5. Hardback also makes for a better missile to help settle rules disputes...

    But seriously, I also usually opt for hardback for any book I expect to keep and use for any length of time. And i agree with the comments about things like charts, maps, and the utility of hardcopy reference materials. (although e-books/pdfs can have their advantages as well, even for reference materials; such as electronic bookmarks and indexes)

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    1. Fitz-Badger,

      I'd never considered the advantages of hardback over softback rules in a dispute before ... but from now on I certainly will! :^)

      Even today, forty plus years on, I still cherish and use the hardback versions of Donald Featherstone's and Joseph Morschauser's books, but not the softback books from that era. As you say, eBooks have their uses, but I don't think that they will replace the printed versions of wargame rules for some time to come.

      All the best,

      Bob

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